Dry fly verses Nymph

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Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby wetnet on Fri Oct 24, 2008 5:46 pm

Anyone have a preference. Dry flies,wet flies or nymphing? What about indicators?
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby TarponJim on Sat Oct 25, 2008 4:57 pm

I don't even own a nymph! Flies float, and usually have wings of some sort. They "fly." Nymphs don't fly, they drift or crawl. Streamers don't fly, they swim or drift. Eggs and worms do whatever eggs and worms do. :shock:

:roll: :roll: Now wait, I've been there and done it for a long, long time. Nymphs, streamers, egg patterns, San Juan worms, flesh flies, bobbers of all sorts, lead in many configurations, the whole nine yards. I guided hundreds of nymph fishermen as well, using bobbers and all. I've slung big "junk" flies in Alaska, and dead-drifted tiny midge larvae in spring creeks and tail waters. I've done it, and now completely given it up.

Beginning more than 10 years ago, and now for the rest of my life, I've determined that I just don't need to catch a fish that bad. There's nothing wrong with fishing sub-surface. In fact, you will catch WAY MORE trout in and under the water than on top of it, but I just don't get anything out of it any more. It doesn't give me any satisfaction. Its just not worth the cast. (sad, but true)

For me, fly fishing is the hunt, the angle of approach, the cast, the placement of the fly, the drift of the current, watching my fly float on the surface, and watching the fish come and take my fly. After the take, I really don't care what happens. If the fish stays hooked, great. If not, I still got it to rise and eat.

It's the visual effect combined with the mechanics of floating a fly to a fish. I will still sometimes "blind" fish a fly as I'm floating along or walking a stream, but mostly I never cast until I see the fish I want to try and catch. Most have risen at least once, but some are just holding underneath. The harder it is to make the fish rise to my fly, the more I like it. Slow, irregular risers that are moving in a gin-clear creek are my favorites. Sometimes I'll spend an hour on one trout, positioning my self, trying not to alert the fish too much, waiting to time a cast, and guessing at the result of each cast. It REALLY counts if I can catch the fish on the first cast! :thumb:

Then there's the ones where I cast, the fish doesn't take, changes position in the water, and says to me, "who are you kidding?" :veryfunny: I then re-position, wait for the fish to resume feeding and/or settle down again, and try another cast. You get the idea. Just me and the fish.

It's no longer about numbers. Its not about the "fight." (most inland trout don't fight, tarpon do! :D ) It's not always about the size, although I will admit to choosing the largest fish I can find to cast to, and passing up casts to several 16-18 inchers for that one cast to a 20 or 22. The larger ones, at least where I fish, are usually a bit more "educated," and therefore a bit more challenging as well.

I've talked about western trout fishing, but the same principles apply to bass fishing with a fly rod (though the "flies" don't have wings, they still float), steelhead and salmon fishing (Both will hit waking, floating flies), and even tarpon fishing (gurglers, on top! :D :D ) I just believe that the fly rod is ideally designed to present a floating "fly", with a floating line. For everything else, that's why God created the Mitchell 300! :veryfunny:

So yes, I just fish on top with the long rod. Personal choice, no other reason. I'll take one fish on a dry over 10 on a nymph. I know I'm in the minority, but there's a few others around who share my choice as well. Some I still fish with on rare occasions.

One person in particular was a client of mine in the early 90's. He was a fishing buddy/side kick of several of the older, famous fly guys from the 50's and 60's many have heard of (Whitlock and Wulff for example). He taught me more about fly fishing for trout than anyone, and is another whole story in himself, as I digress. But, he also taught me why we fly fish, at least him and I. I've never let my fly down since! :D
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby wetnet on Sun Oct 26, 2008 2:58 pm

Well based on the past responses between you and me you might have guessed I'm a nympher. I have to say I've heard allot of arguments about the subject between the dry fly guys and the ones that chose to fish the depths but yours I have to admit is the best pro-dry fly I've heard yet. I nymph mostly because I can't track a dry fly to save my life. My eyesight basically sucks! I fish on the east coast mainly and it seems we have tons of floating pieces of fluff and fuzz that make it hard for me to keep track of a piece of tiny floating lint. I don't use floating indicators or putty but do use a colored backing line indicator so I can see my line. I never had the pleasure of learning from Whitlock or Wulff but my son has had the pleasure to learn a few things which he shared from Joe Humphrey. Always something to learn. I have been working with dries because I think you should be able to use all techniques even if you don't master any. My love however is feeling the nymph bounce tumble and roll below the surface and even though my eyes can't see everything that's going on beneath the water my hands translate the bottom and the hits and misses and once in awhile bring a prize to the surface.
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby TarponJim on Sun Oct 26, 2008 6:02 pm

On most other boards, this subject WOULD turn into an "argument"! I can never understand that. I mean, anybody with a brain knows dry fly fishing is superior, takes more talent, and is the only "real" form of flyfishing. :veryfunny: :veryfunny: :veryfunny: :veryfunny: :veryfunny:

But seriously. How, where, and/or when one chooses to sport fish is his or her own personal preference. No one way is any "better" than any other. Some catch more fish, some catch less, and some, like me, don't care. The subject does make for good discussion and gets the mind thinking about why we fish in general though. And that's a good thing. Too bad they can't keep it civil on most of the other boards. Thankfully, its all a little happy family here. :D

By the way, Merry Halloween Wetnet! ;)

Only two more months 'till the big day!
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby Stripper on Mon Oct 27, 2008 11:29 am

Hey Jim, I respect your love of dry fly fishing and the reason why. I even understand why :!: However I believe your quote is a very strong opinion. "Real" fly fishing? Look back to when it all began. There werent any Wulff patterns or comparaduns. Were dry flies even invented yet?
Here's my opinion.....I like dry flies, cause I can follow a #22 trico and watch the strike. To me, its like topwater fishing for bass. You know theyre in there.....you can see em. How fun is that? Its all in what you make of it.
Youre right about nymphing too....you'll catch 10x more fish subsurface than you will atop. Where I fish however, you cant see through tanic water. One can only guess a fish is in there and thats the fun part.....not knowing! Unless of course theyre rising :good:
I believe the most challenging/"real" form of fly fishing is with a wet fly. For I have yet to master the art of swinging a wet fly. No hard feelings please.....these are my opinions :thumb:
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby wetnet on Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:26 pm

Just because it was the first way doesn't make it the best way or even a more sacred way. If that was the truth, I'd be scubbing my laundry with rocks in the creek. I do hold reverence to seeing someone land a speck on the water and react to the hit and it is something I've worked on with limited success but I am in awe of those who master it. Wet flies are something also I'd love to work on. I've done streamers but it isn't a fly I like to pull out frequently because it can mess up as much water as it can catch fish and truly I use them only in really deep pools when nothing else works. Saw a woman competitor at the American Cup in CO fish the last 15 minutes of her beat catch 3 nice brown fishing wooly buggers. She showed me I can't send line out worth ##@@!!. Man she could cast! I'm no more afraid of arguements about types of flies and how you fish them then I am about comp fly fishing which gets a ton in a roar. I try to listen and if I do shake it up a bit from time to time it's in the shake up that I learn the most. Anyone want to talk about Christmas yet? I need a salmon reel for my Brother. Wouldn't mind shopping early. Oh and talking controversy. Bought my son some pink condoms to tie with. Interesting deeper pool pattern.
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby Stripper on Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:39 pm

Hey Wetnet.....did you read the last sentence of my post :?:

You mean this pattern belonging to Loren?

http://flyguysoutfitting.com/vladiworm.html
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby wetnet on Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:46 pm

Nope it isn't a Loren creation, but it's on his website if you check. Sorry if I missed something and I still might not be up to speed. Never thought I'd see the day I'd be buying my son pink condoms. My younger son picked up the box when it came in the mail and asked what it was and when I told him, he said really what is it so I told him to open it. No it is the vladi's worm. My son actually doesn't use it much. He's got about 5 more traditional patterns he uses and usually sticks to those. I haven't come close to touching the surface fishing wet flies but it is definitely something I'd like to work on given my inability to catch fish rising. I'll work on that too. I will probably be very old before I figure out much of anything except that I love it. As far as Loren he just plan stinks as a fisherman. He walks through the water like bigfoot usually falling down and scares all the fish! :veryfunny: :veryfunny: :veryfunny: :veryfunny: :veryfunny: :veryfunny:
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby Stripper on Mon Oct 27, 2008 6:41 pm

I take that back, Vladi Trzebunia is believed to be the originator of the Vladi worm, Loren just shows a tutorial on his site. I take it you must have fished with Loren in the past for you to speak of him like you have. Or your son doesnt like him for some reason?
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Re: Dry fly verses Nymph

Postby Stripper on Mon Oct 27, 2008 6:46 pm

wetnet wrote:Anyone have a preference. Dry flies,wet flies or nymphing? What about indicators?

Whatever catches the fish on any given day. If it happens to be a nymph, then yes...I use an orange indicator :veryfunny:
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